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  #1  
Unread March 23rd, 2015, 08:43 AM
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MarcJackson MarcJackson is offline
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Default USN F/A-18 weathering

Can some of you experts explain or show how a USN grey on grey jet is weathered.
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Unread March 23rd, 2015, 09:22 PM
D-Rob D-Rob is offline
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I usually start with a factory-fresh paint job. I don't think there's a need for pre-shading. I try and weather them as they actually would in real life. After the initial paint, I spray a light coat of Tamiya Smoke over the entire airframe, with a bit heavier coating along panel lines. I come back with the initial colors and fill in panel areas. After that, I lighten the initial colors and go back over the panels to get some tonal variation. Then I use Light Ghost and do corrosion control touch ups. Finally, I'll do a final thin oil wash with a mix of Lamp Black and Burnt Umber. Here's what it looks like on an R/M kit. Mind you, I'm still playing around with the process, but I'm getting closer.


Last edited by D-Rob; March 23rd, 2015 at 09:25 PM.
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  #3  
Unread March 23rd, 2015, 11:13 PM
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tomthegrom tomthegrom is offline
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You have it pretty bang on. I am no expert but I always paint the basic camo. Then I go back with lightened base colours and make it faded. Then I use a few different greys, maybe some brown, rust or something. Lately too I also stole your idea of using smoke. Then after I have made it all messy go back with the original colours and tone it all down a bit. I like my navy jets to look like they have been worked hard.
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Unread March 24th, 2015, 02:03 PM
Brian Marbrey Brian Marbrey is offline
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I totally agree with Darren and I do the same thing..I think pre-shading is highly overrated personally. I always start with a factory fresh paint job and I start fading colors, gloss coat, gell pen, touch ups and so on..I've totally re-done the entire process of finishes on lo-vis navy jets..I used to have a how to article, but it needed tweaking so I've pulled it down...just never really had a desire to re-post it.
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  #5  
Unread March 24th, 2015, 09:01 PM
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galileo1 galileo1 is offline
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Please repost it, Brian. Would really be helpful to us hopefuls.
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  #6  
Unread March 25th, 2015, 03:56 AM
Adriano Adriano is offline
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For what my 2cents are worth... I think this build looks pretty awesome.
http://www.zone-five.net/showthread.php?t=13534
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  #7  
Unread March 25th, 2015, 06:32 PM
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How do you thin the Tamiya smoke? I usually do 50/50 for Tamiya but isn't the Smoke thicker?
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  #8  
Unread March 26th, 2015, 09:45 AM
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Big Texan Big Texan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwsmith14 View Post
How do you thin the Tamiya smoke? I usually do 50/50 for Tamiya but isn't the Smoke thicker?
I thin all Tamiya paints with Isopropyl Alcohol. 50/50 or more depending on effect you're trying to achieve. Experimentation will save you a lot of grief.

Last edited by Big Texan; March 26th, 2015 at 09:47 AM.
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  #9  
Unread March 27th, 2015, 03:25 PM
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Eddie M. Eddie M. is offline
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IIRC, in an article D-Rob did for FSM, he used very small bits of 0000 steel wool to "scrub' some of the panels after weathering to bring out a lighter shade from the already existing paint to give the appearance of corrosion control. It works very well for me...

Last edited by Eddie M.; March 27th, 2015 at 03:27 PM.
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